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U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced a new set of rules for foreign students in light of the coronavirus pandemic. International students cannot enter or stay in the U.S. if their college offers courses only online in the fall semester. Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images

ICE: Foreign Students Must Leave The U.S. If Their Colleges Go Online-Only This Fall

New federal rules will prohibit international students from completing fully online courses of study while in the U.S. Monday's announcement comes as more colleges release their plans for the fall.

In 2009, Australia's deadliest bushfires on record destroyed Kinglake, a town just over an hour's drive northeast of Melbourne. The disaster had long-term effects on families. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

The Fire, The Virus, The Violence: Australia And The Lessons Of Natural Disasters

Family violence increases in places that have been severely burned in bushfires, Australian research finds. The isolation and financial stress of COVID-19 appear to be exacerbating the problem.

NASCAR Cup Series driver Bubba Wallace stands during the national anthem before a NASCAR auto race Sunday at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

Trump Calls For NASCAR Driver Bubba Wallace To Apologize Over Noose 'Hoax'

The president follows up a pair of divisive speeches over the holiday weekend by castigating the racing body for banning the Confederate flag and saying Wallace should apologize to his fellow drivers.

Police guard access to housing commission apartments under lockdown in Melbourne, Australia. The hard-hit Australian state of Victoria recorded two deaths and its highest-ever daily increase in coronavirus cases on Monday as authorities prepare to close its border with New South Wales. Andy Brownbill/AP hide caption

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Andy Brownbill/AP

Melbourne Resumes Lockdown As Coronavirus Cases Surge

The premier of Victoria state, Australia's second-most populous, issued a six-week stay-at-home order for Melbourne and closed the border with New South Wales state, effective midnight local time.

A researcher at Peking University's Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Genomics conducting tests at their laboratory, Thursday, May 14, 2020. Wang Zhao/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhao/AFP via Getty Images

The Pandemic Is Pushing Scientists To Rethink How They Read Research Papers

Faced with a glut of pandemic research from around the world, scientists are confronting their biases and learning to engage with science conducted at institutions they're unfamiliar with.

Vincent Cox in the salon where he works that's reopened in Boston. Eighty percent of COVID-19 deaths have been in people his age or older. "It's been one of the hardest things I've ever done in my life," he says. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Chris Arnold/NPR

'Almost In Tears': A Hairstylist Worries About Reopening Too Soon

Boston barber Vincent Cox, 65, thinks it's too early to open. "I would go work in an office," he says. "The other guy's six feet away at a desk. I'm not touching him and running my fingers through his hair."

'Almost In Tears': A Hairstylist Worries About Reopening Too Soon

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Lauren Moran, a pastry chef who owns a bakery and café, taste-tests Cornwall's new coffee drinks with her husband, Cornwall's general manager Billy Moran (L), and Speedwell Coffee Company owner Derek Anderson. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Tovia Smith/NPR

Boston Tavern Pivots To 'Plan B' To Try To Survive The Pandemic

Cornwall's has been a Kenmore Square mainstay for more than four decades. Now it's preparing to reopen — and to reinvent itself for survival during the pandemic.

Boston Tavern Pivots To 'Plan B' To Try To Survive The Pandemic

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Jovita Carranza, Administrator of the Small Business Administration, testifies during a Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship hearing June 10, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kevin Dietsch/AP hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/AP

As Americans Avoided Restaurants And Doctors' Offices, Those Businesses Got Loans

The small business sectors that received the largest share of federal loans from the coronavirus relief package known as PPP include restaurants, doctors' offices, car dealerships and law firms.

Ingrid Wall and Joachim Wall, parents of murdered journalist Kim Wall, are interviewed at the inaugural grant ceremony for The Kim Wall Memorial Fund at Superfine on March 23, 2018 in New York City. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Journalist Kim Wall's Parents Show She Was More Than A Victim In 'A Silenced Voice'

Kim Wall was 30 when she was killed by a source. Her parents are working to make sure her name will not be a warning but a tag under ambitious investigative pieces, a line on resumes, a calling card.

Army Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, a military officer at the National Security Council who testified during the impeachment hearings on Capitol Hill, is seen at the White House complex in January. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Sen. Duckworth Waiting For White House Promise Not To Block Vindman's Promotion

Sen. Tammy Duckworth tells NPR that she'll hold up hundreds of Army officer promotions unless she gets an assurance that the Trump administration won't interfere with that of Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman.

The Manhattan District Attorney says he will prosecute Amy Cooper, who called police after a black man asked her to leash her dog in New York's Central Park. Christian Cooper/AP hide caption

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Christian Cooper/AP

Woman Who Called Police On Black Bird-Watcher In Central Park To Be Charged

The Manhattan District Attorney's Office says it is initiating a prosecution of Amy Cooper over false reporting of an incident. In a cellphone video, she claimed a Black man was threatening her.

Students move out of dormitories at San Diego State University in March, after the university cancelled the rest of the semester and has asked students to move out within 48 hours. Nine percent of young adults say they've moved due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images

Survey: 3% Of Americans Moved Due To The Pandemic

Among the young, the numbers shot up: 9% of adults 18-29 have moved due to the coronavirus. Some people moved to avoid catching the virus, while others were forced by the closing of college campuses.

Clockwise from upper left: Lonnie Holley, Fenne Lily, Bill Callahan, Sufjan Stevens, Thomas Bartlett Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Courtesy of the artists

New Mix: Sufjan Stevens, Bill Callahan, Fenne Lily, Lonnie Holley And More

This week's All Songs Considered features an epic new song from Sufjan Stevens, a piano nocturne from Thomas Bartlett, a surprise release from Bill Callahan and more.

New Mix: Sufjan Stevens, Bill Callahan, Fenne Lily, Lonnie Holley And More

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Stands remain empty as family members of United States Military Academy graduating cadets are restricted from attending commencement ceremonies on June 13 in West Point, N.Y John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

West Point Graduates' Letter Calls For Academy To Address Racism

Retired Capt. Mary Tobin, a West Point graduate, is mentor to some recent alumni who wrote an open letter to academy leaders. They're part of a long legacy of Black cadets addressing systemic racism.

West Point Graduates' Letter Calls For Academy To Address Racism

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