NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts NPR delivers breaking national and world news. Also top stories from business, politics, health, science, technology, music, arts and culture. Subscribe to podcasts and RSS feeds.

Latest Newscast

An engineer shows a sample of biodiesel at an industrial complex in General Lagos, Santa Fe province, Argentina. The United States recently imposed duties on Argentine biodiesel, blocking it from the U.S. market. Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images

Turning Soybeans Into Diesel Fuel Is Costing Us Billions

The law that requires America to turn some of its soybeans into diesel fuel for trucks has created a new industry. But it's costing American consumers about $5 billion each year.

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen looks on during a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill Tuesday. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Homeland Security Secretary Says She 'Did Not Hear' Trump Use 'That' Vulgar Word

At a contentious congressional testimony, Kirstjen Nielsen said under oath said President Trump and others used "tough language" on immigration, but not a particular curse word.

Homeland Security Secretary Says She 'Did Not Hear' Trump Use 'That' Vulgar Word

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578415397/578422498" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

President Trump shakes hands with White House physician Dr. Ronny Jackson, following his annual physical at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Jan. 12. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

White House Doctor Says Trump Is In 'Excellent' Physical, Cognitive Health

Dr. Ronny Jackson said the president could benefit from losing between 10 and 15 pounds over the coming year as well as beginning an exercise regimen.

White House Doctor Says Trump Is In 'Excellent' Physical, Cognitive Health

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578424523/578452077" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A man gets ready to let one loose. Not pictured: all the folks around him diving for cover. CSA-Printstock/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
CSA-Printstock/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Man Ruptures His Throat By Stifling A Big Sneeze, Prompting Doctors' Warning

Not long after he suppressed a powerful sneeze, the patient's neck began swelling, crackling and popping. It was a rare case — and he recovered — but doctors say there's a moral here: Just let it rip.

A Rohingya refugee stands in a displaced-persons camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, earlier this month. She is just one of more than 650,000 Rohingya who have fled over the border from Myanmar, where a government crackdown has spawned stories of brutal murder, rape and villages destroyed. Allison Joyce/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Allison Joyce/Getty Images

Myanmar And Bangladesh Agree To 2-Year Timeframe For Rohingya Return

Over 655,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled Myanmar, where alleged ethnic cleansing is underway. Now, the two countries have agreed to a schedule for repatriation — but will the Rohingya actually return?

Clarinetist and band leader Benny Goodman, photographed in 1959, made history as the first musician to perform jazz with an integrated band in Carnegie Hall in 1938. Central Press/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Central Press/Getty Images

How Benny Goodman Orchestrated 'The Most Important Concert In Jazz History'

Eighty years ago, barriers were broken when Goodman took a mixed race band to play jazz to Carnegie Hall.

How Benny Goodman Orchestrated 'The Most Important Concert In Jazz History'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578312844/578422516" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio takes questions from reporters about the relief effort in Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria on Sept. 26, 2017 at the U.S. Capitol. Rubio and Maryland Democrat Chris Van Hollen propose a new Senate bill that would require the intelligence community to report within one month of a federal election on whether there was foreign interference. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Did A Foreign Power Interfere In The Election? New Bill Would Mandate An Answer

Republican Sen. Marco Rubio and Democrat Sen. Chris Van Hollen are offering legislation that would require U.S. spy agencies to report about foreign interference in American elections.

Larry Nassar listens to victim impact statements prior to being sentenced after being accused of molesting about 100 girls while he was a physician for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University. Nassar has pleaded guilty in Ingham County, Michigan, to sexually assaulting seven girls, but the judge is allowing all his accusers to speak. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Gymnastics Doctor's Victims Speak In Court; Simone Biles Says She Was Also Abused

Women talked about the devastating impact of abuse at the hands of sports doctor and admitted sexual assailant Larry Nassar. They spoke out during a four-day sentencing hearing that started Tuesday. The list of accusers is growing longer.

Laurino stands inside his office in Newark. He helped to establish Wynona's House, New Jersey's largest child advocacy center in Newark, and to create Essex County's sexual assault response team. Cassandra Giraldo for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Cassandra Giraldo for NPR

How Prosecutors Changed The Odds To Start Winning Some Of The Toughest Rape Cases

A rape case 25 years ago revolutionized justice for people with intellectual disabilities. They were "unwinnable" rape cases, until prosecutors figured out the secret.

Russell M. Nelson, speaking at a funeral last October, has been named leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Welden C. Andersen /The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints hide caption

toggle caption
Welden C. Andersen /The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Mormon Church Names Russell M. Nelson As New Leader

"My brethren of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles laid hands upon my hands, ordained me, set me apart as president of the church. It was a sacred and humbling experience," Nelson said Tuesday.

Peter Madsen, seen in August after he was rescued from his private submarine. The Danish inventor set out on his brief voyage with Swedish journalist Kim Wall but did not return with her. Now, he has been formally charged with her murder. Bax Lindhardt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bax Lindhardt/AFP/Getty Images

Prosecutors Charge Peter Madsen With Murdering Kim Wall Aboard His Private Sub

The Danish inventor set out in his submarine with the Swedish journalist in August — but she never returned alive. On Tuesday, after months of shifting stories, he was charged with homicide.

Rebeca Gonzalez says she can now afford to buy pomegranates for her family in Garden Grove, Calif., because of the extra money she receives through Más Fresco, a food stamp incentive program for purchasing produce. Courtney Perkes/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Courtney Perkes/Kaiser Health News

Food Stamp Program Makes Fresh Produce More Affordable

Kaiser Health News

A federally funded experimental program is partnering with a Latino grocery chain to reward people who use their food stamps to put more fresh produce on their tables.