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Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., left and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. at a news conference with recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival program (DACA) during a 2017 news conference. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Kushner Meets With Bipartisan Architects Of Dreamer Legislation

Jared Kushner met privately with Sens. Lindsey Graham and Dick Durbin, the two architects of plans to provide citizenship for those brought to the country illegally as children.

Poncho Via stands on a field of grass in Clay County Alabama at the Green Acres Farm in 2017. The steer currently holds the Guinness World Record for having the longest set of horns ever. The Pope Family hide caption

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The Pope Family

Humongous Horns: Texas Longhorn From Alabama Sets Guinness World Record

This steer isn't much different from other Texas longhorns except it holds a world record. Poncho Via's horns were measured at nearly 11-feet wide, that's longer than the Statue of Liberty's face.

William Portwood, who died less than two weeks after NPR confirmed his involvement in the 1965 murder of Boston minister James Reeb, poses for a photograph in front of his home. Chip Brantley/NPR hide caption

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Chip Brantley/NPR

NPR Identifies 4th Attacker In Civil Rights-Era Cold Case

A fourth man was involved in the 1965 attack on civil rights worker and minister James Reeb, but that man was never identified or charged in Reeb's murder, an NPR investigation revealed.

A southern resident orca whale swims in Puget Sound in view of Mount Rainier in 2014. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Whale Watchers Accused Of Loving Endangered Orcas To Death

The question of whether boat-based watching tours are really harmless has become more urgent in Washington state, where Southern Resident killer whales have been declining since the 1990s.

Whale Watchers Accused Of Loving Endangered Orcas To Death

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Boaty McBoatface, an autonomous submarine vehicle, had a successful first mission taking measurements deep in the Southern Ocean. Povl Abrahamsen, British Antarctic Survey hide caption

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Povl Abrahamsen, British Antarctic Survey

Boaty McBoatface, Internet-Adored Sub, Makes Deep-Sea Discovery On Climate Change

Since the delightful snafu that led to the research vessel's goofy moniker, the autonomous submarine has been off gathering deep-sea data on the effects of Antarctic winds.

RVs sit parked on a street near Google's headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., as lower-paid workers resort to living in the vehicles rather than pay steep rent prices. Google says it plans to help 20,000 new homes come onto the local market. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Google Will Devote $1B To Try To Tame Housing Costs In SF Bay Area

Over the next 10 years, Google hopes to help bring 20,000 new homes to the local market. Part of the company's plan calls for rezoning land it owns for residential use.

In California's Mojave Desert sits First Solar Inc.'s Desert Sunlight Solar Farm. California is among the states leading the decarbonization charge. Tim Rue/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Rue/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Going 'Zero Carbon' Is All The Rage. But Will It Slow Climate Change?

Cities, states, businesses and electric utilities are setting ambitious goals to cut greenhouse gas emissions. But it's not clear exactly how they'll do that or whether it will actually work.

Hal Herzog, a professor of psychology at Western Carolina University, says the more we attribute human-like qualities to animals, the more ethically problematic it may be to keep them as pets. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Pets, Pests, And Food: Our Complex, Contradictory Attitudes Toward Animals

Does living with animals really make us healthier? Why do we eat some animals and keep others as pets? This week on Hidden Brain, we talk with psychology professor Hal Herzog about the contradictions embedded in our relationships with animals.

Pets, Pests And Food: Our Complex, Contradictory Attitudes Toward Animals

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Kyle Kashuv, a Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student and survivor of the school shooting, became a nationally prominent gun-rights advocate while many of his surviving classmates instead organized to advocate for gun control. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Harvard Rescinds Offer To Parkland Survivor After Discovery Of Racist Comments

Kyle Kashuv, a Parkland student survivor, was accepted into Harvard, but after the university discovered racist slurs he made when he was 16, the offer was rescinded.

Harvard Rescinds Offer To Parkland Survivor After Discovery Of Racist Comments

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Democratic presidential candidate Montana Gov. Steve Bullock during a campaign stop at a coffee shop on May 17 in Newton, Iowa. As the only Democratic candidate to have won statewide in 2016 where President Trump also won, Bullock argues that he knows how to secure a victory for Democrats in 2020. Steve Pope/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Pope/Getty Images

On The Trail With Democrat Steve Bullock: 'The Only One That Won A Trump State'

The NPR Politics Podcast is hitting the road and interviewing 2020 Democratic presidential candidates; in this episode, Montana Gov. Steve Bullock explains why he's the best pick for president.

On The Trail With Democrat Steve Bullock: 'The Only One That Won A Trump State'

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Facebook says it will launch a new cryptocurrency called Libra and a digital wallet called Calibra in 2020. Dado Ruvic/Reuters hide caption

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Dado Ruvic/Reuters

Facebook Unveils Libra Cryptocurrency, Sets Launch For 2020

Libra will be controlled by a nonprofit group in which Facebook will share responsibilities with companies ranging from Mastercard and PayPal to Uber and eBay.

Facebook Unveils Libra Cryptocurrency, Sets Launch For 2020

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A new Texas law aims to protect patients like Drew Calver, pictured here with his wife, Erin, and daughters, Eleanor (left) and Emory, in their Austin, Texas, home. After being treated for a heart attack in April 2017, Calver, a high school history teacher, got a surprise medical bill for $108,951. Callie Richmond for KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond for KHN

Texas Is Latest State To Attack Surprise Medical Bills

KUT 90.5

A new Texas law says hospitals and insurers will have to work it out when they can't agree on a price — instead of sending huge unexpected bills to patients.

Texas Is Latest State To Attack Surprise Medical Bills

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